(PDF)REINFORCED CONCRETE WITH FRP BARS MECHANICS AND DESIGN

Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars Mechanics and Design pdf

Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars – Corrosion-resistant, electromagnetic transparent and lightweight fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) are accepted as valid alternatives to steel in concrete reinforcement. Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars: Mechanics and Design, a technical guide based on the authors’ more than 30 years of collective experience, provides principles, algorithms, and practical examples.

Well-illustrated with case studies on flexural and column-type members, the book covers internal, non-prestressed FRP reinforcement. It assumes some familiarity with reinforced concrete, and excludes prestressing and near-surface mounted reinforcement applications. The text discusses FRP materials properties, and addresses testing and quality control, durability, and serviceability. It provides a historical overview, and emphasizes the ACI technical literature along with other research worldwide.

  • Includes an explanation of the key physical mechanical properties of FRP bars and their production methods
  • Provides algorithms that govern design and detailing, including a new formulation for the use of FRP bars in columns
  • Offers a justification for the development of strength reduction factors based on reliability considerations
  • Uses a two –story building solved in Mathcad® that can become a template for real projects

This book is mainly intended for practitioners and focuses on the fundamentals of performance and design of concrete members with FRP reinforcement and reinforcement detailing. Graduate students and researchers can use it as a valuable resource.

Antonio Nanni is a professor at the University of Miami and the University of Naples Federico II. Antonio De Luca and Hany Zadeh are consultant design engineers.

Table of Contents – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

PART I

Materials and test methodsIntroduction

Background

FRP reinforcement

FRP reinforced concrete

Acceptance by building officials

Applications

ReferencesMaterial properties

Introduction

FRP bar

Constituent materials: Fibers and resin matrices

Manufacturing by pultrusion – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

ReferencesFRP bar properties

Physical and mechanical properties of FRP bars

Test methods

Product certification and quality assurance

Performance of FRP RC under fire conditions

ReferencesPART IIAnalysis and designFlexural members

Notation – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Introduction

Structural analysis

Initial member proportioning

FRP design properties

Bending moment capacity

Strength-reduction factors for flexure

Anchorage and development length

Special considerations

Serviceability

Shear capacity

Temperature and shrinkage reinforcement

Safety fire checks for bending moment capacity

ReferencesMembers subjected to combined axial load and bending moment

Notation – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Introduction

FRP bars as compression reinforcement

Overall design limitations for FRP RC columns

Reinforced concrete columns subjected to axial load

Design recommendations for FRP RC columns

Bending moment and axial force

Strength-reduction factor for combined bending moment and axial force

Columns subjected to axial load and biaxial bending

Shear strength, Vn

ReferencesPART III

Design examplesDesign of a one-way slab

Introduction

Design summary – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Step 1—Define slab geometry and concrete properties

Step 2—Compute the factored loads

Step 3—Compute bending moments and shear forces

Step 4—Design FRP primary reinforcement

Step 5—Check creep-rupture stress

Step 6—Check crack width

Step 7—Check maximum midspan deflection

Step 8—Check shear capacity

Step 9—Design the FRP reinforcement for shrinkage and temperature

Step 10—Fire safety check for flexural strength per Nigro et al

ReferencesDesign of a T-beam

Introduction

Design summary – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Step 1—Define beam geometry and concrete properties

Step 2 —Compute factored loads

Step 3 —Compute bending moments and shear forces

Step 4—Design FRP primary reinforcement for bending moment capacity

Step 5—Check creep-rupture stress

Step 6 —Check crack width

Step 7—Check maximum midspan deflection

Step 8—Design FRP reinforcement for shear capacity

Step 9—Compute FRP contribution to torsional strength

ReferencesDesign of a two-way slab

Introduction

Design summary

Step 1—Define slab geometry and concrete properties

Step 2—Compute the factored loads

Step 3—Compute bending moments and shear forces

Step 4—Design FRP reinforcement for bending moment capacity

Step 5—Check creep-rupture stress

Step 6—Check crack width

Step 7—Check deflections

Step 8—Check for punching shear (no perimeter beams)

ReferenceDesign of a column – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Introduction

Design summary

Step 1—Define column geometry and concrete properties

Step 2—Compute ultimate loads

Step 3—Design longitudinal FRP reinforcement

Step 4—Design FRP shear reinforcement

Step 5—Check creep-rupture stressDesign of square footing for a single column

Introduction -Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Design summary

Step 1—Define concrete properties

Step 2—Compute service axial loads and bending moments

Step 3—Preliminary analysis

Step 4—Design FRP reinforcement for bending moment capacity

Step 5—Check creep-rupture stress

Step 6—Check crack width

Step 7—Recheck shear strength

ReferenceIndex

Author(s) Bio – Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

Antonio Nanni is the Lester and Gwen Fisher Endowed Scholar, Professor and Chair at the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Miami, and Professor in the Department of Structural Engineering of the University of Naples “Federico II”.

Fabio Matta is a Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Miami, and Associate Director of the NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for “Repair of Buildings and Bridges with Composites”.

Renato Parretti is Professor of Concrete Structures at the University of Naples “Parthenope”.

Preface -Reinforced Concrete with FRP Bars

After 22 years since the formation of American Concrete Institute (ACI) Committee 440 and almost half a century of research endeavors, fiberreinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcement for concrete members is about to see full market acceptance and implementation. ACI Committee 440 has recently started the effort to create a mandatory-language design code that, in addition to other ACI reports, guides, and specifications, and ASTM test methods and material specifications, will be the instrument for this takeoff not just in North America but all over the world. For practitioners and owners, the primary motivation for the use of FRP is the need to improve the durability of concrete structures.

This book is mainly intended for practitioners and focuses on ACI technical literature covering the fundamentals of performance and design of concrete members with FRP reinforcement and reinforcement detailing. Graduate students and researchers can use it as a valuable resource to guide their studies and creative work. The book covers only internal, nonprestressed FRP reinforcement and excludes prestressing and near-surfacemounted reinforcement applications. It is assumed that the reader already has familiarity with concrete as a material and reinforced concrete as a construction technology (i.e., fabrication, analysis, and design). The book is divided into parts that follow the typical approach to design of conventional reinforced concrete.

PART 1—MATERIALS AND TEST METHODS

Chapter 1 deals with the historical background and the state of the art in research worldwide. Reference is made to existing design guides and significant institutional-type literature. Some considerations are provided on limitations in use that are primarily due to a lack of experience rather than engineering. The chapter closes with an illustration of relevant completed projects.

Chapter 2 informs the reader about the characteristics and peculiarities of FRP constituents. Following the spirit of the book, the chapter is limited to the items of primary interest to a designer/practitioner and reference is made to more exhaustive literature on the subject. Attention is devoted to issues regarding testing and quality control as needed for the execution of field projects. Different forms of internal FRP reinforcement are mentioned. Chapter 3 describes available test methods necessary for the determination of the mechanical and physical properties of FRP bars with reference made to more exhaustive literature and available American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM International) standards. Attention is devoted to issues regarding testing and quality control as needed for the execution of field projects.

PART 2—ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

Chapter 4 covers flexural members and provides a detailed explanation of flexural and shear behavior. Types of members covered are slabs (oneway and two-way), footings, and beams. Emphasis is placed on structural reliability and the derivation of the strength-reduction factors. The examples shown in this chapter are only provided for clarification, while more exhaustive design examples are given in Part 3. A section on torsion completes the chapter. Chapter 5 covers members subject to combined axial force and bending moment. This chapter lays the foundation for the acceptance of FRP reinforcement in column-type members, a topic presently ignored by existing design guides. Similarly to Chapter 4, the reader is referred to Part 3 for an exhaustive design example. The chapter covers rectangular and circular cross-section columns and shear walls

PART 3—DESIGN EXAMPLES

Taking a two-story medical facility building as the case study, Part 3 deals with the design of slabs on the second floor (i.e., Chapter 6 for one-way and Chapter 8 for two-way), internal beams (i.e., Chapter 7), column of the first story (i.e., Chapter 9), and isolated column footing (i.e., Chapter 10). It was decided to show the practical implications of design on the key members of a building through the use of Mathcad©. With this powerful computational software, mathematical expressions are created and manipulated in the same graphical format as they are presented so that the reader can easily comprehend the design flow and use the solved examples as a template for real projects.

The idea of this book started many years ago with university students and industry colleagues with the goal of facilitating the implementation of FRP reinforcement in construction and disseminating the experience gathered in the laboratory and numerous field applications. Among the many individuals who directly and indirectly contributed, we must single out the following for a special thank you: Doug Gremel, Fabio Matta, and Renato Parretti.

Reviews

“… a comprehensive reference… Each design example shows step-by-step approaches…”
Civil Engineering Journal, October 2015

“This book is a must-have for the shelf of any student, educator or practitioner in any part of the world. Tony Nanni is one of the world’s greatest pioneers in this field, and this book encapsulates his wealth of experience in an accessible format. Understand this book, and you understand how to design better, innovative and more durable concrete structures.”
—Professor Tim Ibell FREng, University of Bath, UK

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